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For driven dressage judges

Page history last edited by Pat Lamprey 7 years, 8 months ago

 

For the “new to driven dressage” judge:

 

Tests are “backwards” for you ridden dressage judges. They’re oriented with A at the top and C at the bottom of the diagrams. Movements are always executed when the horse’s nose reaches the specified marker unless otherwise stated. (e.g., Halt with rear axle at X.”)

 

Tests for 20 Mile House CDT, July 15, 2012:

     Training level test:  Training 2.pdf

     Preliminary level test:   Preliminary 4.pdf

     Intermediate level test:  Intermediate 6.pdf

American Driving Society Rulebook:  ADS Rulebook-2013-final x2-29Nov12.pdf

     p. 147-154, Article 929 ff. – rules for dressage in combined driving events

     p. 77-92, Article 97 ff. – driven dressage competitions

     p.135, Article 917 – general participation in Competition A, driven dressage

 

Additional information on dressage and judging

     bit & harness diagrams.pdf

     Judging Driven Dressage.pdf  (with highlights) (right click on document, then Rotate Clockwise twice)

     Driven Dressage for the Single Horse - Rabinowitz.pdf

 

Videos of dressage tests:  (Scored as penalty points, so lower is better!)

     Training level test #2

            Sterling Graburn, Indiana CDE 9/2010, 49.51 penalties or 70.52%     

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yZ8hdLi4Vn0

     Preliminary level test 4

Linda Smith, Paulsen AZ CDE 5/2007, 47.18 penalties or 68.57%

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLsFG59EYO4

     Intermediate level test 1

Jada Neubauer, Hickory Knoll CDE 7/2010, 57.28 penalties or 64.17%

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M2KtzEgCRJ4

     Advanced level / FEI test 9 

Shelly Temple, Live Oak CDE 3/2011, 41.60 penalties or 74.00%

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhGxgWJwnYc

     Advanced level / FEI test 8A  [lowest score ever recorded at a recognized competition]  

Boyd Excell, World Equestrian Games 10/2010 30.08 penalties or 81.2%

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmY1gfBJdZI

 

Below:

     Salutes in driven dressage

     Judging multiple turnouts

     Scoring

     Error of test / Error of course

     Broken harness during a test

     Disobedience

     Summary of dressage penalties

     Collective marks at end of test

          Driver's aids

          Presentation

     People on the vehicle

     Calling / reading tests

     Execution of tests

     Judge / competitor relationship

 

--------------------------------------

 

Salutes: (ARTICLE 115 EXECUTION OF THE TESTS)

3. At the salute, drivers should take the reins in one hand. A lady shall raise the whip vertically or horizontally in front of her face; a gentleman shall remove his hat and let his arm drop loosely along his body or may render the salute as does the lady. The whip salute is used to acknowledge the judge at the start and finish of an individual test or at the beginning and end of a dressage test. The whip salute is also performed in the following ways:

a) By moving the whip, held in the right hand, to a vertical position, the butt end even with the face.

b) By moving the whip, held in the right hand, to a position parallel with the ground, the handle before the face.

c) A gentleman may place the whip in his left hand and remove his hat.

 

3. Multiple Turnouts (ARTICLE 933 JUDGING)

Pairs, Tandems and Four-in-Hands will be judged as a whole and not as individual horses.

 

1. Marks (ARTICLE 936 SCORING)

Marks out of 10 will be awarded for each numbered movement and for each heading under General Impression on the following basis:

10: Excellent

9: Very Good

8: Good

7: Fairly Good

6: Satisfactory

5: Sufficient (Marginal)* [* ADS adopted “Marginal” for a mark of “5,” January 13, 2008]

4: Insufficient

3: Fairly Bad

2: Bad

1: Very Bad

0: Not Executed

 

2. Error of Test

If a Competitor attempts to perform a movement, or attempts to maintain the pace required, and fails to do so, but does not deviate from the track, the President of the Ground Jury may either treat it as an “Error of Course” (see paragraph 3 below), or he may decide to leave the Judges to give the movement an appropriate mark. If a Competitor makes no effort to perform a movement in a Test, then it may either be treated as an Error of Test or as an Error of Course at the discretion of the President of Jury.

 

3. Error of Course

3.1 An “Error of Course” is when a Competitor deviates from the required track or when a movement is performed at the wrong pace, or omitted altogether.

3.2 In the event of a Competitor making an Error of Course, the President of the Ground Jury will ring the bell and stop the Competitor. The Competitor must then resume the test from the beginning of the movement where the error was made. If the Competitor is in any doubt, he may ask the President of the Ground Jury for guidance, without incurring any further penalties.

 

4. Disconnected or Broken Harness

4.1 If the reins, pole strap, chains or trace become disconnected or broken, or should the horse get a leg over the pole, trace or shaft, the President of the Ground Jury must ring the bell and a Groom(s) must dismount and reconnect or repair as appropriate. The Competitor will be penalized for a Groom(s) dismounting.

 

5. Disobedience

Any resistance in the forward movement, kicking or rearing is considered to be disobedience and will be penalized by the Judge at C as follows:

1st incident 5 penalties

2nd incident 10 penalties

3rd incident Elimination.

 

ARTICLE 937 SUMMARY OF DRIVEN DRESSAGE PENALTIES

1. Competitors are liable to the following penalties:

1.1 Article 932.1 ........ Early or late entry .................................. possible Elimination

1.2 Article 917.3.2 ..... Entering the arena without a whip ......... 10 penalties

1.3 Article 917.3.3  .....Dropping or putting down a whip ............ 10 penalties

1.4 Article 917.2.5 ..... Incomplete presentation of Competitor ..... 5 penalties

(For ADS exception, see Article 917)

1.5 Article 917.5 ........ Incomplete presentation of Groom ........... 5 penalties

1.6 Article 918.2 ........ Incomplete presentation of vehicle .......... 5 penalties

(For ADS exception, see Article 918)

1.7 Article 936.3 ........ Error of Course:

First occasion ......................................................... 5 penalties

Second occasion ..................................................... 10 penalties

Third occasion ........................................................ Elimination

1.8 Part of the turnout leaving the arena during a movement ..... mark down for inaccuracy

1.9 The whole turnout leaving the arena .................................... Elimination

1.10 Vehicle overturning ............................................................ Elimination

1.11 Article 926.2, 903.3  Groom(s) dismounting

1st incident .............................................................. 5 penalties

2nd incident ........................................................... 10 penalties

3rd incident ............................................................ Elimination

1.12 Article 903.3 ........ Competitor dismounting ........................... 20 penalties

1.13 Article 902.8.1 ..... Lame horse............................................... Disqualification

1.14 Article 919.2.1 ......... Use of bandages or brushing boots (Horse to

be inspected after test) .............................................................. 10 penalties

1.15 Article 926.2 ........ Outside assistance ................................... Elimination

1.16 Article 936.5 Disobedience

1st incident ............................................................. 5 penalties

2nd incident ........................................................... 10 penalties

3rd incident ............................................................ Elimination

1.17 Article 918.1.3 ..... No breeching if vehicle has no brakes ........ 5 penalties

1.18 Article 913.3.2 ..... Contravening the rules on advertising ....... 20 penalties

(For ADS exception, see Articles 913.2 and 913.3)

 

Collective marks at the end of the test/score sheet:

Driver’s aids:

  • Driver’s use their voices! It’s expected. We have no seat or legs, so we’ve got to use voice. However – we shouldn’t be yelling or having to constantly nag. If you find what the driver is doing irritating or inappropriate, it would be OK to say so, but don’t mark down on the FACT of using voice.

  • Handling of reins – hands should be in front of us – not off to one side or the other. Doesn’t matter where we sit (the right, please! – unless the vehicle has a built-in center seat) – the reins go through turrets on the harness saddle, so will always go straight from saddle to horse’s mouth, therefore there’s no reason to have hands in the middle of the seat when we’re sitting off to one side. Several different ways of holding reins. All are OK. Only advanced drivers are REQUIRED to do things one-handed, and then it’s only specific movements. Reins can be held like riding reins. They can be held as though you were plowing or long-lining (coming out the top of each hand – weakest of the various grips.) They can be held all in the left hand. They can be held so that they’re in the left hand with the right rein being pulled out and also held by the right hand. (See Rabinowitz, p.12 & 18. P. 18 is top view of the last style.)

  • Whip – when not in use, belongs at a 45 degree angle up and forward with the lash not touching the horse. Always held in the right hand (and can only be put down in the marathon phase). Can be used on either side of the horse (preferably without doing anything dramatic to the reins at the same time!). USUALLY under the belly for more impulsion, on the barrel for bending or lateral movement, on the shoulder to stop falling in. On the butt (or slapping reins on the butt) is poor form and gets a hollowed back. Whip must be long enough for the lash to reach the shoulder of the lead horse, but may be tied or wrapped around the shaft to keep long dangly ends off the ground.

Presentation:

  • We’re doing this “on the move.” It can be done at the halt as a class all by itself, but we don’t want to go there in a one day event. You won’t be able to see a lot of detail. Just go for glaring things. A few are absolutes.

  • Driver MUST wear hat, BROWN gloves, apron, and must carry a whip at all times. Fancy vehicles get fancy clothes; casual gets casual – but only just so far – straw hat rather than top hat; sports coat instead of suit, etc. – all the pieces still have to be there. Gloves can be any shade of brown, but darker is better – the idea is that with colors, the leather has been dyed -- the dye gets on your hands. So, we’re looking for natural leather/skin colors, not dyed.

  • Aprons can have straps that fasten in back or can just be something like a lap-robe that tucks under the legs & seat. The object is to keep the clothes clean – dust from the horse, dirt & oil from the reins. Aprons can come to mid-calf or go down to the ankles. They’re worn OVER everything else – jackets shouldn’t be pulled out over them. Then can be worn a little higher than the waist, but shouldn’t be up near the armpits.

  • Men – black or brown shoes, dark socks, slacks, jacket, shirt, tie, hat, apron, brown gloves.

  • Women – slacks or longish skirt, dark stockings with skirt, LONG-SLEEVED blouse, (dresses are OK too – but again, long sleeves), jacket or vest not necessary, brown gloves, apron, hat. Hats shouldn’t be huge – you don’t want the wind to catch the brim – and brims should be stiff enough that the driver isn’t having to look out from under. And they shouldn’t look as though they’re in costume – this is contemporary clothing not costume. (I wear the same stuff I wear to work – just add hat, gloves, apron.)

  • Helmets are always acceptable instead of hats, but should be dark. (Think hunter show.)

  • Vehicle: Should fit the horse – neither too big & heavy, nor too small. Shaft tips should come to point of shoulder (except some modern metal vehicles where they stop at the girth) – not way out in front. Shafts should be level with ground or very slightly up. Vehicle shouldn’t be right on the horse’s butt. Clean, in good condition. It is not longer required that vehicles have rear reflectors or rear lamps. Lamps in front are only necessary for advanced drivers or if the vehicle has brackets for lamps. Slow moving vehicle signs (orange triangles) are not required, but some people have them fairly firmly attached, so don’t mark people down if they have them. Many drivers will have some sort of basket or toolkit. Not required, but it used to be – don’t worry one way or the other.

  • Harness: No boots or wraps or any type allowed in dressage.  (Driver of horse with bandage for an injury should notify organizer ahead of time.)  Harness should fit the horse! No dangling straps, no really loose pieces. Clean, in good repair, metal shined. Metal on the harness is supposed to match metal on the vehicle (brass with brass; chrome with chrome). If the shafts of the vehicle are black patent leather, the harness should be black; if brown, the harness should be russet. Reins should always be russet from end to end. Harness can either have collars or breast straps. Collars are more formal. They may also be used with heavier vehicles. Single horse harness has more pieces than pair harness. If there are no brakes on the vehicle, the harness must have breeching (except minis). See diagrams.

  • Bits: Diagrams in the rules really just show riding bits -- snaffles, low port curbs, mullen mouth bits. Standard driving bits usually have shanks – liverpools (long shank with 2-3 slots), elbow bits (shank with right angle & multiple slots), butterflys (shanks made of loops – reins can fasten at various spots like slots) – see the Rabinowitz book & separate photocopy. Four-ringed snaffles are also common, as are half-cheek snaffles. (Full-cheek are not recommended because the top part can catch on things.) Kimberwickes are OK too.

  • Horse grooming: There is no requirement or encouragement to braid in driving. Advanced level drivers often will, but there’s no standard. A driving horse’s tail is NEVER braided. In general, for driving horses they will be braided or not and have long or short manes and long or banged tails according to what you would see for that breed in a pleasure show. You’ll see Morgans and Arabs with flowing tails and long or “netted” manes. You’ll see warmbloods with braided manes or hunter length manes and banged tails. Quarterhorses might have banded manes or loose manes. You may see matte polish on feet, but not the “patent leather” finish you’ll see on show Saddlebreds. You shouldn’t see the overdone, “made-up” look of show Arabs and Saddlebreds. In general, shiny coat, tangles out of manes and tails, clean coat and feet, whiskers trimmed, but no extreme grooming. No boots or leg wraps of any kind allowed.

 

People (other than the driver) on the vehicle:

  • Single horse drivers MAY have a groom on board for dressage and cones. The groom must be dressed as a groom - formal or stable livery (slacks, jacket, hat (bowler, flat cap), BROWN gloves, or hunt clothes). NEVER an apron. (Apron makes the person a passenger, and passengers aren't allowed.) The groom need not leave the carriage when the carriage when the carriage is at a stop unless the horse needs to be headed.

  • Pairs and tandems MUST have ONE GROOM. Four-in-hands MUST have TWO GROOMS. No other passengers for dressage EXCEPT FOR HANDICAPPED DRIVERS, who may have a passenger/groom regardless of what level they’re driving.

  • Grooms wear hats and brown gloves, but NO APRONS. Grooms for formal vehicles wear white breeches, black boots with brown tops (that come up to about 3” below the knee), black coats (like a long dressage coat), white shirt with stand-up color and white plastron or tie folded flat, black top hat and brown gloves. (If the driver is not wearing a top hat and suit, then the groom is overdressed if in a top hat and long black coat.) Grooms for informal vehicles may wear hunt clothes (boots, breeches, etc.) with BROWN gloves, or – preferably - paddock boots, slacks, jacket (sports coat type), shirt (tie required for men, OK for women), BROWN gloves, and hat – flat cap, bowler, derby, etc.

  • Passengers (for training level only) dress like the driver -- (But no Bobbsey Twins, please! – harmonize but not match exactly) – including hat, gloves (you can forgive something other than brown here – the passenger is not intended to handle the horse, so may have gloves to go with what he/she is wearing), and apron (matching the driver’s).

  • Groom or passenger must not speak – dressage tests may no longer be “called” or read.

  • For pairs and four-in-hands, the groom(s) must be sitting on a separate seat behind the driver. For singles and tandems, the groom may sit behind or beside the driver, depending on the configuration of the vehicle.

 

Calling/reading tests: No longer allowed at any level, but we might choose to be flexible on this to get newer/ younger competitors involved. We’ll let you know if so.

 

Execution of tests:

  • Bending – Contrary to what some people think, driving horses CAN and SHOULD bend in the shafts. Lots of people don’t ask them or train them to, however. Biggest problem for bending is space in the shafts. It’s harder for pairs to bend than singles – they kind of have to work around each other, and usually have to be taught to bend as singles. Because of they way they’re hitched in a pair, you can’t control each horse separately – it’s a single unit. Horses should NEVER be counter-flexed. Straight around corners isn’t a huge sin, but bending is preferred.

  • Breaks in gait – It’s generally considered that in a pair or four-in-hand, if only one breaks gait, then the turnout is still at the correct gait. You can be lots stricter on this for dressage than on marathon, however, since obedience is such a big piece of dressage.

  • Location of movements – Because a horse & vehicle is long, it’s generally accepted that you execute a movement when the horse’s nose (the leader’s nose in a tandem or four) passes the specified letter, unless the test specifies something else (such as “halt with axle at B”).

 

Judge/competitor relationship – Less formal than in other disciplines. It’s not uncommon for a judge to speak to a competitor at the end of a test, and certainly afterwards if they meet on the grounds. Competitive driving is still a pretty small community and not too formal – judges often will approach competitors on their own to make suggestions or offer help.

  

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